Summer in the South by Paul Laurence Dunbar

The rain comes down in a torrent sweep
And the nights smell warm and piney,
The garden thrives, but the tender shoots
Are yellow-green and tiny.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Posted on

Paul Laurence Dunbar was one of the first African Americans to receive national recognition as a poet. His parents, freed slaves from Kentucky, shared stories with him that inspired his writing career. A classmate of Orville Wright and a friend of Frederick Douglass, Dunbar tenaciously went after his dream to share his poetry and was labeled by Douglass as “the most promising young colored man in America.” Dunbar did, indeed, go on to publish numerous works, and in honor of the sweat-breaking temperatures here in the local area of Kingdom Winds, we invite you to enjoy one of his poems “Summer in the South.”


The oriole sings in the greening grove

          As if he were half-way waiting,

          The rosebuds peep from their hoods of green,

          Timid and hesitating.

The rain comes down in a torrent sweep

And the nights smell warm and piney,

The garden thrives, but the tender shoots

Are yellow-green and tiny.

Then a flash of sun on a waiting hill,

Streams laugh that erst were quiet,

The sky smiles down with a dazzling blue

And the woods run mad with riot.

 

 

Featured Image By Mike Enerio

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
The views and opinions expressed by Kingdom Winds Collective Members, authors, and contributors are their own and do not represent the views of Kingdom Winds LLC.

About the Author

Kingdom Winds is an online platform and marketplace dedicated to expanding the reach and success of Christian authors, artists, artisans, musicians, podcasters, filmmakers, and ministries!